Events On Campus

Resetting the Code is about learning from others. We encourage you to attend events and learn about other cultures, identities, and experiences. Step out; Reset.

Apr 27
Take Back The Night Rally5:00 p.m.

Take Back The Night is a yearly international protest aimed at raising awareness about the realities of sexual violence on campus and in the community, both for survivors of...
April 27 5:00 p.m.–8:00 p.m.
Erb Memorial Union (EMU), Amphitheater

Take Back The Night is a yearly international protest aimed at raising awareness about the realities of sexual violence on campus and in the community, both for survivors of sexual violence and those who want to support and bear witness in solidarity. Take Back The Night is a survivor-centered event that begins with a rally in the EMU Amphitheater, continues as a march through the streets of Eugene and ends with a speak-out off campus – during which survivors of sexual assault and their allies can share personal stories of how sexual violence has impacted their lives.

May 1
Pride Week 201712:00 a.m.

The LGBTQA3 and LGBT Education and Support Services is sponsoring our annual University of Oregon’s Pride Week. Pride Week is a chance for everyone to explore and understand...
May 1–5
Various Locations

The LGBTQA3 and LGBT Education and Support Services is sponsoring our annual University of Oregon’s Pride Week.

Pride Week is a chance for everyone to explore and understand the variety and complexity of issues facing LGBTQIA+ people in a pre-dominantly white, cisgender, heterosexual culture. The week is a chance to celebrate the incredible work and activism of LGBTQIA+ people. It is a yearly reminder of the history of the LGBTQIA+ community and a time to reenergize ourselves for the next year of work towards liberation.

There are various events happening during Pride Week 2017, including:

May 2nd – Pride Picnic and Intersectionality FairMay 3rd – Miss Major, Keynote SpeakerMay 4th – Black & Pink Letter WritingInformation about these events and the rest of the Pride Week activities can be found on University of Oregon Calendar.

May 2
Diversity Career Night5:00 p.m.

GET INSPIRED // MAKE CONNECTIONS // FEEL EMPOWERED Join us for Diversity Career Night to connect with local and regional employers interested in talking with you! Diversity...
May 2 5:00 p.m.–8:00 p.m.
Erb Memorial Union (EMU), EMU Ballroom

GET INSPIRED // MAKE CONNECTIONS // FEEL EMPOWERED

Join us for Diversity Career Night to connect with local and regional employers interested in talking with you!

Diversity Career Night:

Open to all students
Focused on underrepresented students and alums (including persons of color, those who identify as LGBTQ, persons with disabilities and veterans)
Great opportunity to engage with employers
Participate in a professional development workshop
Hear from inspiring speaker Roy Juarez Jr. who's dedicated his life to creating positive change in communities across the country. REGISTER HERE

May 2
Beyond the Emerald Tower II: LGBT Career Forum6:30 p.m.

Join UO's student chapter of the National Lesbian and Gay Journalists Association (NLGJA) for our event, Beyond the Emerald Tower II. Its purpose is to let our soon-to-be...
May 2 6:30 p.m.–4:00 p.m.
Erb Memorial Union (EMU), Redwood Auditorium

Join UO's student chapter of the National Lesbian and Gay Journalists Association (NLGJA) for our event, Beyond the Emerald Tower II. Its purpose is to let our soon-to-be graduates know what role their LGBTQ status might play in their lives once they get into the professional working world.

We have brought in a variety of professionals who can speak to the professional working environments of journalism, PR, advertising, photography and more both here and around the country.

May 4
MOST (Men of Strength) Club: Reconscructing Masculinity6:00 p.m.

Please join the Men's Center for this term's weekly MOST Club workshops! These workshops are welcome to all genders in the UO community with our goal being to help all people...
April 6–June 8
Straub Hall, Room 253

Please join the Men's Center for this term's weekly MOST Club workshops!

These workshops are welcome to all genders in the UO community with our goal being to help all people live better lives by reconstructing masculinity into a more socially just construct. We will provide food and beverages.

Come for the pizza, stay for the discourse!

If you have any questions please find our Facebook page, "University of Oregon Men's Center"

May 10
Margo Jefferson: "The Ethics and Aesthetics of Cultural Criticism"7:30 p.m.

“How do we bring all the traditions that have shaped us—intellectual, social, and cultural—to complex questions of identity and community? How do we find language that gives...
May 10 7:30 p.m.–9:30 p.m.
Lillis Business Complex, Room 182

“How do we bring all the traditions that have shaped us—intellectual, social, and cultural—to complex questions of identity and community? How do we find language that gives them specificity and subtlety; that honors contradiction?” These are some of the questions Pulitzer Prize-winning writer, cultural critic, journalist, and professor Margo Jefferson, will address as this year’s Kritikos Professor in the Humanities.

Jefferson goes on to say, “We speak, for example, of class, race, gender, and intersectionality; how do we live them and question their boundaries? How do we teach ourselves to go beyond the limits of our own experience? What intellectual, emotional, and imaginative tools do we need?”

The daughter of a prominent physician and social worker-turned-socialite mother, Jefferson grew up in an upper-middle class black neighborhood of Chicago in the 1950s and ‘60s. She writes about her experiences growing up in post-war America as a member of a privileged African American family in her memoir, Negroland, which won the 2015 National Book Critics Circle Award for Autobiography, The International Bridge Prize, and The Heartland Prize.

Jefferson currently teaches writing at Columbia University School of the Arts. Her previous book was On Michael Jackson. She has been a staff writer for The New York Times and Newsweek, and has published in New York Magazine, The Nation, The Washington Post, The Believer, Guernica, Bookforum, O, the Oprah Magazine, Vogue, and Grand Street. Her essays have been anthologized in: The Best American Essays, 2015; The Inevitable: Contemporary Writers Confront Death; What My Mother Gave Me; The Best African-American Essays, 2014; The Mrs. Dalloway Reader; Black Cool; and The Jazz Cadence of American Culture. She also wrote and performed a theater piece, Sixty Minutes in Negroland, at The Cherry Lane Theater and The Culture Project.

May 11
Margo Jefferson: "The Ethics and Aesthetics of Cultural Criticism"7:30 p.m.

“How do we bring all the traditions that have shaped us—intellectual, social, and cultural—to complex questions of identity and community? How do we find language that gives...
May 11 7:30 p.m.–9:30 p.m.
White Stag Block, Auditorium

“How do we bring all the traditions that have shaped us—intellectual, social, and cultural—to complex questions of identity and community? How do we find language that gives them specificity and subtlety; that honors contradiction?” These are some of the questions Pulitzer Prize-winning writer, cultural critic, journalist, and professor Margo Jefferson, will address as this year’s Kritikos Professor in the Humanities.

Jefferson goes on to say, “We speak, for example, of class, race, gender, and intersectionality; how do we live them and question their boundaries? How do we teach ourselves to go beyond the limits of our own experience? What intellectual, emotional, and imaginative tools do we need?”

The daughter of a prominent physician and social worker-turned-socialite mother, Jefferson grew up in an upper-middle class black neighborhood of Chicago in the 1950s and ‘60s. She writes about her experiences growing up in post-war America as a member of a privileged African American family in her memoir, Negroland, which won the 2015 National Book Critics Circle Award for Autobiography, The International Bridge Prize, and The Heartland Prize.

Jefferson currently teaches writing at Columbia University School of the Arts. Her previous book was On Michael Jackson. She has been a staff writer for The New York Times and Newsweek, and has published in New York Magazine, The Nation, The Washington Post, The Believer, Guernica, Bookforum, O, the Oprah Magazine, Vogue, and Grand Street. Her essays have been anthologized in: The Best American Essays, 2015; The Inevitable: Contemporary Writers Confront Death; What My Mother Gave Me; The Best African-American Essays, 2014; The Mrs. Dalloway Reader; Black Cool; and The Jazz Cadence of American Culture. She also wrote and performed a theater piece, Sixty Minutes in Negroland, at The Cherry Lane Theater and The Culture Project.

May 12
Arts & Cultural Equity: Current Examples & Relevant Strategies9:30 a.m.

This forum brings together arts and cultural workers, managers, and educators to share current insights, experiences, and practices around equity. Presenters will represent the...
May 12 9:30 a.m.–2:30 p.m.
White Stag Block, Room 142

This forum brings together arts and cultural workers, managers, and educators to share current insights, experiences, and practices around equity. Presenters will represent the range of equity work within Portland-based arts and cultural organizations and groups, as well as the experience of other key equity leaders in Oregon and SW Washington. Featured speakers and panelists are joining the forum from Arts Workers for Equity, Oregon Shakespeare Festival, and the Regional Arts and Culture Council among others.



This event also celebrates the 20th anniversary of CultureWork: A Periodic Broadside for Arts and Culture Workers. CultureWork is a timely work-place oriented publication of the UO's Center for Community Arts and Cultural Policy, serving arts and cultural management practitioners and our fields. The event is also presented in collaboration with the UO's Historic Preservation Program and special support from the Regional Arts and Culture Council.



Registration and coffee will begin at 9:00am.



Please RSVP for this event here by Friday, May 5 at 5:00p PST. Contact the Center for Community Arts and Cultural Policy at ccacp@uoregon.edu with any questions.

May 18
Elevate Engagement12:00 a.m.

On May 18-21, 2017, UO-SOJC’s Agora Journalism Center and Journalism That Matters will co-host “Elevate Engagement: Communities and journalism taking listening, connection and...
May 18–20
George S. Turnbull Center

On May 18-21, 2017, UO-SOJC’s Agora Journalism Center and Journalism That Matters will co-host “Elevate Engagement: Communities and journalism taking listening, connection and trust to the next level.”

We are in a moment of opportunity to consider the role of storytelling and journalism in civic life.

From a generous grant from the Knight Foundation, we invite you to join practitioners on the leading edge of engaging with communities to learn from one another and to develop more practical, actionable ideas that can be shared and used beyond the gathering.

We’re building on the October 2015 “Experience Engagement: How communities and journalism can thrive together,” that Agora Journalism Center and Journalism That Matters co-hosted. The three-day convening generated abreakthrough vision for a civic communications ecosystem. It also:

Produced illuminating reportsCreated a network of practitionersInitiated a platform to enhance collaborationAttracted funding for a new wave of activityThis open-space gathering is for journalists, community storytellers, active citizens, students, educators, researchers, funders, social entrepreneurs, librarians, information technologists, urban designers, sustainability experts and other pioneers in engagement.

The emphasis: How can the public engage, not as an audience, consumers or marketplace, but as participants, with journalists, in creating and sharing local news and information?

This challenge combines the original public service purpose of journalism with emerging opportunities made possible by interactive communication technologies. Our goal is to help people have, create and share the news, information and connection they need to make the best possible decisions for their lives and their communities.

Some questions we will explore together:

How do we develop a new sense of values and ethics that makes engagement viable and productive for communities and journalists?How do we build trust, credibility and relationships in the age of engagement?How can communities and journalists not just trust, but rely on each other?How can temporary relationships built around a project or story be prolonged into lasting relationships built around connecting and storytelling?How can communities have more complete storytelling about civic life?How can people who are not journalists serve as connectors within communities and with media?How can news and information gaps be filled within communities, as well as by media?How can journalists engage more fully in in civic life, while maintaining credibility and trust?What are the best tools and techniques for community connection?Who are the exemplars and what can others learn from them?What is journalism in an interdependent, interactive world?These questions seem particularly relevant in the aftermath of the presidential election, including concerns that media haven’t been listening thoughtfully to all communities. We welcome your suggestions for other questions to address.

Our goal: Together, we’ll generate actionable tools, illuminate promising practices and develop strategies for helping communities have the news, information and connection they need to create thriving, healthy, inclusive communities.

Join us in a lively and productive exchange around challenging questions with a diverse group of peers who care about storytelling with civic impact — the capacity to address shared public challenges.

May 20
Soromundi Sings Broadway7:30 p.m.

|ON SALE AT THE UO TICKET OFFICE IN THE EMU| Presented by Soromundi: Lesbian Chorus of Eugene This year, Soromundi’s annual spring concert will highlight Broadway music...
May 20 7:30 p.m.–4:00 p.m.
Hult Center for the Performing Arts

|ON SALE AT THE UO TICKET OFFICE IN THE EMU|



Presented by Soromundi: Lesbian Chorus of Eugene

This year, Soromundi’s annual spring concert will highlight Broadway music that spans more than fifty years, from 1954’s “The Pajama Game” to 2006’s “Fun Home.” The songs being performed offer a glimpse of the various events and emotions that have shaped our stories. LGBTQ lives and issues have long found a home in the arts, and the theatrical community has a staunch history of fundraising for issues within the queer community such as the AIDS crisis. Soromundi, in keeping with its commitment to inclusion through the power of music, invites you to celebrate with us this varied history of Broadway.

May 21
Bird Church- Birding Walk8:30 a.m.

Join experienced birder Jules for breakfast and an easy stroll through Alton Baker Park on this queer-led, queer friendly bird walk. Bring binoculars and a birding book (extras...
May 21 8:30 a.m.–noon
Outdoor Program Barn

Join experienced birder Jules for breakfast and an easy stroll through Alton Baker Park on this queer-led, queer friendly bird walk. Bring binoculars and a birding book (extras available). FREE!

May 23
How to be a Social Justice Ally3:00 p.m.

Have you ever wanted to be an ally, but didn't know how to get involved? If so, come to this one-hour workshop to gain strategies for engaging in social justice activism as an...
May 23 3:00 p.m.–3:50 p.m.
Erb Memorial Union (EMU), Duck Nest (041)

Have you ever wanted to be an ally, but didn't know how to get involved? If so, come to this one-hour workshop to gain strategies for engaging in social justice activism as an ally and learn how to offer support and respect to historically marginalized communities. No sign-up required, all students are welcome to drop in.

May 23
BE Home with Renee Watson7:00 p.m.

Portland, Oregon was home for author Renée Watson. Watson grew up during one of the fastest gentrification periods in the city's history. It was here that she became an...
May 23 7:00 p.m.–8:30 p.m.
Erb Memorial Union (EMU), 214 Redwood Auditorium

Portland, Oregon was home for author Renée Watson. Watson grew up during one of the fastest gentrification periods in the city's history. It was here that she became an award-winning author and a professor at PSU. One of Renée’s passions is using the arts to help youth cope with trauma and discuss social issues. Her two latest young adult novels are: Piecing Me Together and This Side of Home, which was nominated for the Best Fiction for Young Adults by the American Library Association. Her books explore a myriad of topics including: inequality, poverty, racism, gentrification, personal development and finding our way home. Join us for BE Home

About the BE Seriese: Who could you BE?

College is more than lectures. More than tests. More than going through the motions.

It’s about finding out possibilities of who we could be and who we already are. The BE Series brings together thinkers, makers, disrupters in every field to share their ideas on issues that really matter. Innovation. Social justice. Mental health.

Each talk is aimed to spark inspiration for us to go out into the world and choose who to become. Maybe come up with a plan. Discover an insight. Find out what you are capable of. We choose speakers who are challenging the status quo and inspiring us to be more.

May 25
OUT/Loud Queer and Trans Women's Performance Fest6:00 p.m.

OUT/LOUD is Eugene’s queer and trans women’s performance fest, celebrating the music, poetry, and art of queer women, transwomen, non-binary folks, femme identifying people,...
May 25 6:00 p.m.–8:00 p.m.
Global Scholars Hall, Great Room 123

OUT/LOUD is Eugene’s queer and trans women’s performance fest, celebrating the music, poetry, and art of queer women, transwomen, non-binary folks, femme identifying people, and AFAB individuals. This year we will be celebrating our 17th anniversary of the festival on May 25th with a diverse performance from locals and out of town artists on the Queer and Trans spectrum.

This event is important to the University of Oregon’s vibrant LGBTQ scene as a space where we are not only validating the work of some of some of the most underrepresented groups, but also engaging in liberating play and enjoying community. The reality of female queer and transwomen artists being paid historically less than their cisgender and/or male/masculine counterparts; supporting events like OUT/LOUD is fundamental to helping queer and trans women safely express their personhood. While we must honor the struggles of queer and transwomen of all races, ethnicities, abilities, and ages, OUT/LOUD offers us the opportunity to also celebrate this resilient group.