Events On Campus

Resetting the Code is about learning from others. We encourage you to attend events and learn about other cultures, identities, and experiences. Step out; Reset.

Oct 21
Public Talk -- Hope to Resist: Battling Erasure and Inserting Our Histories into National Narratives with Helena Maria Viramontes, Author of Under the Feet of Jesus4:00 p.m.

Helena Maria Viramontes, author of the UO's 2019-2020 Common Reading book selection Under the Feet of Jesus, will speak to the campus community about her work as an author and...
October 21 4:00 p.m.–6:00 p.m.
Erb Memorial Union (EMU), Ballroom

Helena Maria Viramontes, author of the UO's 2019-2020 Common Reading book selection Under the Feet of Jesus, will speak to the campus community about her work as an author and activist. Topics of the book that may be addressed include farm labor, migrant labor, environmental racism, Chicana feminisms, or migrant healthcare systems. Viramontes' talk will include readings from Their Dogs Came With Them and Under the Feet of Jesus.

Oct 21
Design For Spatial Justice Lecture Series5:15 p.m.

"Land/Landed" Pryanka Bista and Zannah Matson, visiting faculty fellows in Design for Spatial Jusice Professor Bista is a Nepali-Canadian architect and...
October 21 5:15 p.m.–6:30 p.m.
Lawerence Hall, Room 206

"Land/Landed"

Pryanka Bista and Zannah Matson, visiting faculty fellows in Design for Spatial Jusice

Professor Bista is a Nepali-Canadian architect and designer working at the intersection of public interest design and biodiversity conservation. She is the Co-Founder and Design Director of KTK-BELT studio working collaboratively with local communities to create the “Vertical University” project in Eastern Nepal spanning an 8,000-meter vertical gradient from Koshi-Tappu Wildlife Reserve (67 m.) to Mount Kanchenjunga (8,586 m.), the third tallest peak in the world. She has previously held the position of Senior Architect and Planner at Collaborative Media Advocacy Platform (CMAP), Nigeria, where she worked on the “Human City Project” employing participatory mapping, planning and design techniques in informal settlements of Port Harcourt.

Professor Matson’s research and design work focuses on the histories and contemporary reinterpretations of landscapes throughout processes of colonization, violence, and state infrastructure projects. Her current project focuses on a highway development project in Colombia’s eastern piedmont region in an investigation that brings together questions of landscape visuality, infrastructural promise, state-sponsored colonization, haunting violence, and extractivist economic motivations. Matson is a PhD Candidate in Human Geography at the University of Toronto and holds a Masters of Landscape Architecture from the Harvard Graduate School of Design. In professional practice, Matson has worked with Public Work, MassLBP and OPSYS Landscape Infrastructure Lab, where she was the Project Manager and Exhibition Designer for the Canada Pavilion at the Venice 2016 Biennale Architettura. 

Oct 22
Racing to Change: Oregon's Civil Rights Years—The Eugene Story11:00 a.m.

Racing to Change chronicles the civil rights movement in Eugene, Oregon, during the 1960s and 1970s—a time of great upheaval, conflict, and celebration...
October 12 2019–May 10 2020
Museum of Natural and Cultural History

Racing to Change chronicles the civil rights movement in Eugene, Oregon, during the 1960s and 1970s—a time of great upheaval, conflict, and celebration as new voices clashed with traditional organizations of power. Co-developed by the Museum of Natural and Cultural History and Oregon Black Pioneers, the exhibit illuminates legacies of racism and the unceasing efforts of Oregon's Black communities to bring about change. 

Through photographs, recorded interviews, and historical archives, Racing to Change explores how racist policies and attitudes created a pressing need for bold civil rights activism in Eugene. Firsthand accounts from movement organizers, former UO students, elected officials, and other members of Oregon's black communities paint a vivid picture of the area's past, and urge us to take part in building a more just future. On view through May 10, 2020.

Oct 22
Language as Action6:00 p.m.

Helena María Viramontes will talk about how her fiction writing is the way she practices activism for social justice. Join Helena Maria Viramontes, author of the UO's...
October 22 6:00 p.m.–8:00 p.m.
Eugene Public Library, 2nd Floor

Helena María Viramontes will talk about how her fiction writing is the way she practices activism for social justice. Join Helena Maria Viramontes, author of the UO's 2019-2020 Common Reading book selection Under the Feet of Jesus, in conversation with local organizations and activists concerned with issues such as farm labor, migrant labor, environmental racism, Chicana feminisms, and access to quality healthcare, food, and transportation.

Oct 28
Design For Spatial Justice Lecture Series5:15 p.m.

"House/Housed" Karen Kubey and Menna Agha, Visiting Faculty Fellows in Design for Spatial Justice Professor Kubey is an urbanist specializing in housing and...
October 28 5:15 p.m.–6:30 p.m.
Lawrence Hall, Room 206

"House/Housed"

Karen Kubey and Menna Agha, Visiting Faculty Fellows in Design for Spatial Justice

Professor Kubey is an urbanist specializing in housing and health. She is the editor of the book Housing as Intervention: Architecture towards Social Equity (Architectural Design, 2018). Kubey co-founded the New York chapter of Architecture for Humanity (now Open Architecture/New York) and co-founded and led the New Housing New York design competition. Kubey was the curator of “Low Rise High Density,” an exhibition and program series at the Center for Architecture in New York on the legacies and potential futures of low-rise, high-density housing. She is a recipient of the Wilder Green Fellowship at the MacDowell Colony and an International Social Economic Environmental Design (SEED) Award.

Professor Agha investigates concepts of public space, the emotional in the built environment, and territoriality of the landless. She focuses on the idea of “active marginality,” and is occupied with questions such as; how to build for, from, like, and within the margin. Agha believes that the critical issue of marginality should be prominent in architecture studio, not only in academic research. Agha is a third-generation displaced Nubian; her inquiry is rooted in a personal and generational experience of spatial injustice. Her research on Nubian displacement has been published in “The Non-work of the Unimportant” and in “Liminal Publics, Marginal Resistance: Learning from Nubian Spaces.”

Oct 30
ReWire Film Festival featuring Transfinite7:00 p.m.

A sci-fi omnibus feature film composed of seven standalone short stories where supernatural trans and queer people from various cultures use their powers to protect, love,...
October 30 7:00 p.m.–9:30 p.m.
Erb Memorial Union (EMU), Redwood Auditorium

A sci-fi omnibus feature film composed of seven standalone short stories where supernatural trans and queer people from various cultures use their powers to protect, love, teach, fight and thrive. Followed by a Q&A session with actor, D'Lo and cinematographer, Aja Pop, of Transfinite.

Nov 4
Design For Spatial Justice Lecture Series5:15 p.m.

"Place/Placed" Chris Cornelius (studio:indigenous) and Garrick Imatani (Pacific Northwest College of Art) Professor Cornelius, an enrolled member of the Oneida...
November 4 5:15 p.m.–6:30 p.m.
Lawrence Hall, Room 206

"Place/Placed"

Chris Cornelius (studio:indigenous) and Garrick Imatani (Pacific Northwest College of Art)

Professor Cornelius, an enrolled member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin, focuses his research and practice on the architectural translation of culture; in particular, American Indian culture. He is the founding principal of studio:indigenous, a design and consulting practice serving American Indian clients and an associate professor in the Department of Architecture at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

Garrick Imatani is an artist who uses embodied perception, fabrication, and performance to think through the role of landscape, collective history, and racialized bodies within the United States. Imatani’s process frequently stems from research, site visits and collaboration, resulting in sculptures, installations, drawings, photographs, videos, and public projects exhibited nationally and internationally. Imatani, associate professor and chair of the Foundation program at Pacific Northwest College of Art, recently completed a commissioned public art project for the University of Oregon’s Straub Hall.

Nov 12
13th Annual Rennard Strickland Lecture: “Tribal Sovereignty: The True Origins of Environmental Law,” with Mary Kathryn Nagle (Cherokee Nation)6:00 p.m.

The Thirteenth Annual Rennard Strickland Lecture, with special guest lecturer Mary Kathryn Nagle, will be held on Tuesday November 12, 2019 at the Knight Law School with...
November 12 6:00 p.m.
William W. Knight Law Center

The Thirteenth Annual Rennard Strickland Lecture, with special guest lecturer Mary Kathryn Nagle, will be held on Tuesday November 12, 2019 at the Knight Law School with a reception at the Many Nations Longhouse to follow.  Mary Kathryn Nagle is a playwright and a partner at Pipestem Law, a firm specializing in tribal sovereignty of Native nations and peoples.  Her talk is titled “Tribal Sovereignty: the True Origins of Environmental Law.”